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After the Race. Two Gallants. The Boarding House. A Little Cloud. A Painful Case. Ivy Day in the Committee Room. A Mother. The Dead. Public domain Public domain false false. Categories : works Spoken works Collections of short stories PD-old Hidden category: Main pages with authority control data. Namespaces Page Discussion.


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It also almost forced me to park myself anywhere and write something worthwhile, but that's another story, I hope, someday. What do I think of Joyce? The man's a genius, undoubtedly. He does what he set out to do masterfully. He lays Dublin bare. His writing is powerful, unassuming and devoid of judgment. It can often be emotionally draining and occasionally soul-crushing to read his stories if you manage to get into them, which can be a demanding task considering the colloquial language and the quotidian, sparse, yet very representative plot lines.

It is awe-inspiring to watch him lay out the intricacies of character interplay mainly through authentic dialogue. The protagonists age as the book progresses, so while the first story is from the point of view of a seven year old child, the final story is The Dead, recognizably about death and old age, his most famous short-story. Through these characters belonging to different backgrounds and age groups, he paints a realistic, stark picture of Dublin.

There are also stories which are first-person narratives, where he gets under the skin of the characters inhumanly well, 'A Painful Case' being an apt example and my favourite story. Everything said, a necessary addition to any book-lover's collection. View all 4 comments. Dubliners is a good collection to read on a quiet Sunday evening, if only to disappear from the rest of the world and into Joyce's version of Dublin, Ireland.

It's also a good feeling to delve into a book that was accepted for publication in , and yet, "due to puritan prudery, it got passed from fearful publisher to fearful publisher" until someone had the good sense to publish it nine years later. Thank you for the publication and for reiterating Joyce's reasons of isolation from Victorian Dubliners is a good collection to read on a quiet Sunday evening, if only to disappear from the rest of the world and into Joyce's version of Dublin, Ireland. Thank you for the publication and for reiterating Joyce's reasons of isolation from Victorian society; perhaps this is why he understands the "outsider" narrative so deeply.

When I taught a College Program at a rural high school, I found Joyce's short stories easy to teach because not only do they have the layered and crisp writing a student at that level digests easily, but a few of the stories also deal with the theme of choice, which makes for great lecture discussions. Take "Eveline" for example, where a young woman must choose whether to leave her drunken and abusive father by escaping with her sailor fiancee, or to abide by the promise she made to her dying mother: to stay home and take care of the home; notwithstanding the idea she'd found her mother "pitiful" to have led such a life.

Imagine the discussions, ponders, and distilling essays that arose from such a story. So I decided to revisit this collection of fifteen stories, each written with the ordinary life in mind, each a reminder of the choices of love, family, and career; each an encapsulation of loneliness and emotional and spiritual awakening.

You don't get the same writing style of A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man , but you get the same thematic undertones. And somehow, you don't read a Joyce book without finding yourself engulfed in moments of reflection. In "Little Cloud," there is the struggle with parallels, as a main character sees his friend's poetic success as his measurement of success and this leaves him disillusioned as he watched the scene and thought of life; and as always happened when he thought of life he became sad.

A gentle melancholy took possession of him. He felt how useless it was to struggle against fortune, this being the burden of wisdom which the ages had bequeathed to him. And just as one wonders whether the character in "Little Cloud" accepts his life as a father and husband, or whether he fails at it in his pursuit of a poetry career, one wonders about the characters in "The Boarding House" because this is how Joyce ends his stories: inconclusively. You read, you decide. The characters in "Boarding House" are young and in love, but their society dictates that after their brief affair, marriage should be inevitable.

But is he ready for marriage like she is? She was a little vulgar; sometimes she said I seen and If I had've known. But what would grammar matter if he really loved her? He could not make up his mind whether to like her or despise her for what she had done. Of course, he had done it too. His instinct urged him to remain free, not to marry. Once you are married you are done for, it said.

According to the editor of this collection, Joyce left Ireland with feelings of "rage, resentment and revenge;"I would also add, disdain of spiritual shackles. Some of these feelings are also embedded within these stories, as in "The Sisters" and "An Encounter". But just as he highlights the torment of conformity, in some small way, he also indicates the beauty of individual thinking. View all 19 comments. A collection of 15 short stroies by James Joyce all set in Dublin and first published in They form a naturalistic depiction of Irish Middle class sife in around Dublin in in the early years of the 20th Century.

This is my second reading of this collection and this time I listened to the audio book which was narrated by Jim Norton and his Dublin accent was excellent and he really does bring the book alive with his rich voice. The stroies were all written when Nationalism was at its peak in Ire A collection of 15 short stroies by James Joyce all set in Dublin and first published in The stroies were all written when Nationalism was at its peak in Ireland and this come accross in quite a few of the stroies althought it was only on reading the stories the second time around that I had a better understanding of the deeper meanings of some of them and this was only because I was concentrating more on the stroies because this was a book club read and I need to get the most out of the book in order to discuss.

My favourite story of the collection was Eveline A young woman weights her decision to flee Ireland with a sailor. I really enjoyed this story and while only four pages long there was so much going on that I really look forward to discussing this one in a group. I also enjoyed A painful Case a stroy where Mr Duffy rebuffs Mrs Sinico, then four years later realises that he has condemned her to loneiness and death. While I am not a lover of short stories at the best of times I was eager to try Joyce's short story collection as a bookclub read as it is short and quite readable in comparrasion to Ulysses which is not on my to read list.

While written in quite a few of the stories are very relatable to in today's society which I found quite interesting. While I didnt love the book I did like it and found it very readable and am looking forward to the discussiing all the stories at next meeting. View 2 comments. Dubliners is a collection of fifteen short stories Story of a city while you are reading, you will feel more comfortable with city and citizens you will find many personalities that are interesting to you this is a wonderful book that is full of emotions.

Nevertheless, I picked this one up for two reasons. There was another third reason, a minor one at that, that this book had short stories and I felt that short stories should be easier to understand and read than a full length book. How wrong was I, I knew only after I started it. I did that and I was mesmerised.

I felt as though I was walking through those roads, visiting those places, drinking tea or stout amidst those very people who shared their stories with me. He pulls you into conversations where you have no reason to be included, and worse he pulls you in when the conversation has already begun and is going on in full force. Further, he never explains the background or even the beginning of the conversation. You feel as if you have literally fallen into a hole where there is a lot of buzzing around you and you have to make sense of this buzz.

Added to this, is the fact that Joyce pulls you out before you can get to the end of this conversation. In short, what all this means is that there is no proper beginning, no middle and no end to the story. All this is actually enough to put off a reader as it might often seem and sometimes it truly does that there is no sense in what is being said or what is happening. However, he manages to convey important messages despite this flaw or maybe because of it, you tend to start thinking a little bit more than usual, about the narrator, the narrative, the way it is being narrated and the abrupt end.

No these stories are all dark, depressing and pretty dreary. They talk about the three stages of life — child, youth and the middle aged moving towards the old and finally culminating in death. The tone is morose, the tale is sad, the characters are full of angst and dreariness and yet you come out of it satisfied, if not happy; learning more if not really a scholar; emotional, if not really bursting into tears.

Whatever I might feel about the individual stories, I will have to accept that each and every one of them brought out emotions in me that were long dormant and this I owe to the beautiful prose. Taut with tension, stingy with truth or completeness, buried in an assault of emotions or in some cases nary an emotion, the stories felt alive. I was living in Dublin, walking through those very streets and looking into the lives of these characters and being one with them. Instead, I got the dreary Ireland that is full of pain and remorse, anger and ineptitude, and yet somehow it shone like a loving star, a loving human star — full of faults, full of emotions and full of the Irish nature that I have come to love through books.

In fact, it has made my fear more as every word has a meaning and a reason for why it is there and I am not sure that I am or would ever be capable of understanding it all. However, this trip has definitely made me understand why Joyce is called a difficult author to read and comprehend. It has helped me see a little into his prowess and his storytelling. It has made me love him for all that and fear him more for the same. And in the end, it has left me eager to walk through those lanes, albeit several years later, it could be different, and yet I am truly eager to get there and pay my respects to the land that was described in this book.

As I write this on the penultimate day before I leave for Ireland, I have a sense of peace and some knowledge, the country might be different but people everywhere are the same. I promise you that it will be worth your time. View all 16 comments. I suppose I've always intended to read Joyce; it's terribly daunting but seems inevitable, too, that I must follow the man all the way through to Finnegans Wake.

I have a copy. Another remnant of the days when I thought I was on Earth to prove some kind of a point. But I'm still awfully curious, and this year I finally dipped a toe in. Dubliners came first and seemed easiest to start with, and I'd read a story or two of it already. And indeed it is pretty conventional, even self-consci I suppose I've always intended to read Joyce; it's terribly daunting but seems inevitable, too, that I must follow the man all the way through to Finnegans Wake. And indeed it is pretty conventional, even self-consciously spare in style. And it is masterful and instantly absorbing.

If I were a more serious student of literature I suppose I would know to what extent Joyce is following the narrative mode of the extant literature in his world in , and to what extent he is using narrative devices that are familiar to me only because later writers imitated him. Writing is a sequence of choices, details named amid an infinitude of details omitted, and no matter how terse, flat, and neutral the style, Joyce continually manages to reclaim your attention with virtually every phrase, wasting nothing.

Here is part of a character introduction, from A Painful Case : His cheekbones also gave his face a harsh character; but there was no harshness in the eyes which, looking at the world from under their tawny eyebrows, gave the impression of a man ever alert to greet a redeeming instinct in others but often disappointed. He lived at a little distance from his body, regarding his own acts with doubtful side-glances. He never gave alms to beggars and walked firmly, carrying a stout hazel.

The stories often seem principally to be character sketches, or exercises in placing ultimately regrettable behaviors in their context to explore and explain them. An ambitious youth goes to foolish excesses in order to live for a night in the style of cosmopolitan foreigners. A conniving matron bullies her daughter's beau into a marriage he doesn't want. A mousy, straitlaced man, suddenly feeling trapped in a dull and shameful life, commits a minor, real, mean act, immediately regretted; the next story puts this into perspective with the narrative of a day leading up to outright cruelty.

These things pervade the book, in fact. Dublin is dull and shameful; Dubliners long to leave but cannot. And through all the impediments of church and class and poverty that dog them all, drunkenness recurs again and again, prominent in nearly every story. A bit of reading outside the borders of the text tells me that Joyce, terribly particular about every detail of his writing, intended the book as a moral indictment of the people of Dublin and of Ireland as a whole, and that in fact he left Dublin forever within a short time of the book's publication, settling in France where he wrote the rest of his works.

So in an important sense this book isn't meant for me, and it's hard to know how much Joyce was leaning on images and phrases that Dubliners of his day would have found familiar, beyond the occasional Irish word or idiom that I can't quite follow. And it is largely a condemnation, in the end, of the city and its people.

I can't say whether he meant the book--his parting shot to his native country--to shine a light on Dublin's problems and inspire people to improve them, or if he thought his countrymen hopeless and just had to tell them how much they vexed him. At last in The Dead the narrative looks more or less directly at this underlying discontent.

Gabriel Conroy is not so unlike Joyce himself: an urbane, cultured writer with one foot out of Ireland and a clear discomfort even with visiting it for the holidays. He is a subtle and likable character, sympathetically portrayed. But when a young woman calls him out for his alienation from his own country, he is too easily rattled; so deep is his discomfort with his home that he cannot stop himself from exclaiming "I'm sick of my own country, sick of it!

Does Joyce? Is he putting himself on the spot, here, and admitting that he doesn't really have an answer either? Or if he described his own book as a moral index of his country, should we take its chapters as a proxy answer for Gabriel Conroy: that he, and his author, are sick of Ireland because everyone there is mired in poverty and alcohol and the parochial concerns of their little lives? It's difficult to tell here whether Joyce judges the conversation in favor of Gabriel, who seems evasive and troubled in his conscience, or Miss Ivors, who may be impolitic but who has Gabriel sussed.

What is clear, from Joyce's own life, is that Gabriel is the one he must identify with. In his Dublin, every character either longs to escape "dirty old Dublin" or is plainly presented as small-minded in some way. They're all sick of it, and Joyce can't quite spell out why. At least not clearly enough for this reader, a hundred years later. All that said, it's an excellent read, one of those cases where the canons of the ivory-tower literati are so powerfully vindicated that I fret whether I should just accept their judgments every time.

Dubliners is so powerful and assured that I have to give it five stars just for the execution of it. But the message--I guess the message might just not be meant for the likes of me. View all 6 comments. It's a bitter, brilliant account of what we now call "news. Male prostitution, in "Two Gallants.

The Dubliners Live in Dublin 1984

Bullying at work turns into drunken child abuse at home, in "Counterparts. I don't know who did more in their fiction to create modern news, Joyce or Hemingway. Traces of both remain even in the much abraded news on the tube. Simple declarative sentences, a la Hemingway. Raw, cruel human behavior a la Joyce. Subjects like sexual abuse and bullying pepper the news.

Maybe Joyce invented the News as we know it, and Hemingway invented the apparently guileless, simple prose with which to convey our news.

Joyce's Dubliners - Family Resemblances in Dubliners - Presses universitaires François-Rabelais

Aug 18, Selby rated it it was amazing Shelves: therapy , fiction , favorites. I really did. I've read Ulysses. I've also read multiple study-guides; slogged through countless websites of analyses. I'm still resentful at Ulysses. Right when you are about to give up, with finality, you come across one of those lines. Those Joyce nuggets. Those snippets of such purity you wonder if he is but a vessel through with a literary higher power is speaking.

Then the magic wears off and you spend another four hours resisting a good ol' fashion book burning. I've read Portrait of the Artist. I even enjoyed it. I'm sitting at work. I do residential mental health counseling. It is the middle of the night; half-fourish. I come across a blurb about his short story The Dead, which I've never read, do an internet search, the entire novella pops up.

Half asleep I read The Dead. Then that final paragraph. Then that final sentence. Done with James Joyce I thought I was.

Now I'm going to have to go straight out and buy Dubliners when I get off work. Fuck you James Joyce. I get there around 8am. I sit in my car, dozing off, waiting for the "city of books" to open its door. I buy Dubliners. I get home. I've slept something like 4 hours in the last 36 hours. I open Dubliners. Night after night I had passed the house it was vacation time and studied the lighted square of window: and night after night I had found it lighted in the same way, faintly and evenly. If he was dead, I thought, I would see the reflection of candles on the darkened blind for I knew that two candles must be set at the head of a corpse.

James Joyce

Now I knew they were true. Every night as I gazed up the window I said softly to myself the word paralysis. It had always sounded strangely in my ears, like the word gnomon in the Euclid and word simony in the Catechism. But now it sounded to me like the name of some maleficent and sinful being. It filled me with fear, and yet I longed to be nearer to it and to look upon its deadly work. These stories can stand alone as snippets of Dublin life; gentle little snarky character studies. But read one after another is a much more rewarding experience.

I do not believe these were meant to stand alone, they build upon each other with such power. Climaxing with that ending in the Dead - the single most beautiful passage ever written in the English language. I won't bore you with plot or analysis.

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If you are reading this review I'm sure this would be redundant. I will tell you: I am going to read this again on my day off in a couple of days. When was the last time you read something, felt an irresistible compulsion to go out and buy it, then felt compelled to re-read it again as soon as you can? This is the power of Dubliners. If you are resisting Joyce, I understand. If you loathe stream-of-consciousness prattle, I understand. If you abhor literary modernism as a whole, I understand. I deeply empathize with all of these viewpoints. I am still going to sit here and tell you that you need to read Dubliners.

You need to read Dubliners. View all 5 comments. Sep 04, Nathan "N.


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  7. Now everyone does it. But this stuff was new back in its day. It's familiar to us, this kind of fictioning. Because our best fictioneers have learned from Joyce and stuff like this. His other books always show up in this other books. And a reminder to us and to myself, that 'Joycean' is not always a Ulysses reference nor even a reference to the Joyce of The Wake for which we have that fortunate term "Wakean" but can also refer to the Joyce of Dubliners or the Joyce of Portrait. There is something larger to the Joycean project which extends far beyond the thing about word play and 'stream-of-con' ; something whole, something redeeming, something reconciliatory.

    Something visionary and about how the world both is and can be such that the two are not distinguished. Something which is sum'd in Molly's "Yes" and in Livia's flowing to the sea and returning to her headwaters. And in this political season perhaps Dubliners is even more apropo for us USofAians. Dubliners written in anger at what his fellow Irish had allowed themselves to become, an anger rooted in both what they are and what they ought to be.

    I just think one could imaginatively project a cycle of Dubliners stories for this sick and decrepit country which is ours. And it would be Joycean. View all 11 comments.

    The Dubliners

    Aug 30, Steven Godin rated it really liked it Shelves: ireland , classic-fiction , short-stories. Dubliners is one of those books that simply tracks life. Joyce had written most of these stories by the age of twenty-three, he did so with the understanding and forbearance of someone much older. He often portrayed himself as sitting in judgment on his fellow Dubliners, whom he once described to a friend as the most hopeless, useless and inconsistent race of charlatans I have ever come across.

    Am sure he didn't mean it. What gives the stories their tremendous power is precisely their refusal to Dubliners is one of those books that simply tracks life. What gives the stories their tremendous power is precisely their refusal to make judgements. The men and women depicted in this collection are mostly a shabby bunch: drunkards, wife-beaters, narcissists, hypocrites. But Joyce is careful to show the forces that have made them who they are, the exigencies that constrict them, the disillusionments that have sapped their will to act differently from others.

    He believed that by showing us ourselves, he could help us understand each other better, forgive each other more often, and break out of our holding patterns and begin to change. He believed that redemption was something we could achieve for ourselves. Taking in the aspirations of the people in the city we see what they wish for, and what they envisage for their offspring.

    In all then on the surface a deceptively easy book to read, but think deeper and this becomes something that not only can give plenty of pleasurable reading, but also a fascinating time if you really wish analyse the finer details in each tale. They appear here very much in the correct order as we progress through the stages of life, and this is very fulfilling. The reason for not giving five stars even though 'The Dead' is easily worthy of that on it's own is simply down to fact some stories were better than others.

    Sep 25, Annelies rated it really liked it Shelves: modern-classics , non-contemporary-uk. I must confess I dreaded a little to start reading something of James Joyce. I think I made the wright choice to start with 'Dubliners'. I really appreciated the stories although they are not always easy to understand. The last story for example begins with festivities for Christmas. At the end of the party the woman of the main charachter introduces herself. She descends from the staircase as in many ghoststories the ghost appears. One wonders if it's a ghost, if she's just an image that Gabrie I must confess I dreaded a little to start reading something of James Joyce.

    One wonders if it's a ghost, if she's just an image that Gabriel sees. From than on it is a story of the couple and the bound between them. Joyce makes any effort to accentuate death. Is the woman then dead as we first tought? Also Gabriel is obsessed by death More exactly the death of former boyfriends of his wife. In the end they are in bed and he asks himself: "One by one they where all becoming shapes. Better pass boldly into that other world , in the full glory of some passion, than fade and wither dismally with age.

    He thought of how she who lay beside him had locked in her heart for so many years that image of her lover's eyes when he had told her that he did not wish to live. The stories also end with this story and with death. Also in the first story we see death as a priest lays on his deathbed.

    A young boy was his friend and can not accept he is death. Though he is confronted with truth and learns about death. You could say the stories form a cycle: they begin and end with death. Further in the other stories we see a whole kind of different persons: how they live, what they do and what they say. So no luxuries for them. Their life is basal and although it is, they mostly enjoy it.

    It gives an important picture of live in Dublin around This is a book of ghosts; a book full of life and death, and how lives are affected by life and death, and how the dead affected the lives of the living. Joyce makes one feel how all of these Dubliners are living; you will get swept up in their lives. Some stories are better than others, but they all had something to bring to the life Dublin.

    I can see this was the first stepping stone to getting to Ulysses from the use of the daily happenings of people. I loved the links that some of the stori This is a book of ghosts; a book full of life and death, and how lives are affected by life and death, and how the dead affected the lives of the living. I loved the links that some of the stories carried from one to the next, from "Grace" to "The Dead", to male characters clearly did not want any candles. Better pass boldly into that other world, in the full glory of some passion, than fade and wither dismally with age.

    View all 3 comments. Aug 06, Brian Yahn rated it liked it. Araby and The Dead probably are two of the best short stories ever written, but other than those two, nothing in this collection stood out to me. Joyce's prose is equal parts excellent and dated, making it something at times I really enjoyed, and others hated. In general, I'm a big fan of accessible books, and while these stories are by no means Finnegans Wake, they're still a little too symbolic for my taste, and still too light on plot and character personalities to hold my interest.

    Aug 03, John rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: readers who want to know the world in its noisy entirety. Shelves: short-story-masters , avatars-gods-energy-sources. Brilliant and encyclopedic as James Joyce was -- the artist who, more than any other, hauled the ancient storytellers' calling to distill an entire culture into the 20th Century -- his work in prose began with this subdued, sequenced exercise in urban heartache, and it's the book I choose to celebrate for Goodreads. But DUBLINERS provides the ur-version for what's become a fiction staple, the community portrait i Brilliant and encyclopedic as James Joyce was -- the artist who, more than any other, hauled the ancient storytellers' calling to distill an entire culture into the 20th Century -- his work in prose began with this subdued, sequenced exercise in urban heartache, and it's the book I choose to celebrate for Goodreads.

    To be sure, the book stands on a formidable not to say Jesuitical arrangement, moving from childhood to public life, but more than that, each story focuses powerfully on the core tragedy of city existence: how it surrounds a person with the temptation for better, for transcendence, yet in so doing demonstrates our limitation and weakness. Better yet, the stakes are mortal. Childhoods are compromised in an afternoon, lifelong unhappiness guaranteed in an evening, and no one ever has enough money. No one ever has enough; I can't think of any drama so grimly unrelenting about economic and family burdens, yet so resonant with an empathy-sonar capable of sounding every abyss.

    Stories register even the shifts in the nervous system of a dim, frail creature like Maria in "Clay," or an abusive, cowed drunk like Farrington in "Counterparts. Joyce allows the rhetoric to rise just once, in the baroque closing passage of "The Dead," so in the end suggesting the only redemption these twilit seaport figures may ever know: the loving yet cold-eyed reframing awarded them by art. As powerful a commitment to the form to be found in English. The original fourteen stories should be read as a set piece : as they portray the evolution of thought from childhood to adulthood: from dogmatic belief to reasoned denial.

    The Dead should be read separately. View all 45 comments. Oct 23, David Schaafsma rated it it was amazing Shelves: best-books-ever , fictionth-century. It had always sounded strangely in my ears, like the word gnomon in the Euclid and the word simony in the Catechism.

    This is the first time I am hearing it read aloud, in the appropriately Irish voice of Connor Sheridan, that somehow captures the dry and at sometimes mournful wit the ex-patriate Joyce brings to this tribute to the Dubliners he left behind. Some have found it dry and maudlin, even grim, primarily a critique of the people Joyce left behind, but I found it at turns gently satirical, sometimes melancholy, and always loving, portraits of a time and place, filled with local politics and religion and especially finely sketched characters, some stories focused on lost opportunities for love or leaving.

    In Time Magazine listed the greatest novels of the twentieth century and listed the difficult English major Everest of Ulysses as the worthiest literary mountain to climb, 1, which prompted thousands of Americans who may never have read novels to read the first three pages and promptly declare Joyce a boring and inscrutable idiot.

    But Joyce is an amazing writer; he wrote four works of fiction, in increasing levels of difficulty and formal experimentalism. If you like short stories and want to try Joyce I would try Dubliners, the most recognizably traditional stories. No, I have not yet finished it, and probably never will. Dubliners, published in after nearly ten years of his trying to get it published! He was shouted at to go on but he still called to her. She set her white face to him, passive, like a helpless animal.

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    Her eyes gave him no sign of love or farewell or recognition. He thought that in her eyes he would ascent to an angelical stature; and, as he attached the fervent nature of his companion more and more closely to him, he heard the strange impersonal voice which he recognised as his own, insisting on the soul's incurable loneliness.

    We cannot give ourselves, it said: we are our own. He had an odd autobiographical habit which led him to compose in his mind from time to time a short sentence about himself containing a subject in the third person and a verb in the past tense. A song that was sung at the party reminded her of a time when she was seventeen when she had loved a boy, Michael Furey, who lost his life in the war. Gabriel is jealous of a love she sees Greta had for this boy, a love that he and Greta have perhaps never had themselves. The work of the writer is nothing more than a kind of optical instrument that the writer offers.

    It allows the reader to discern that which, without the book, he might not have been able to see in himself. But real adventures, I reflected, do not happen to people who remain at home: they must be sought abroad. Dubliners is a wonderful collection, short enough to read in a few hours.

    However, I can say that it's been a revelation to discover that Joyce's early work is so accessible. I found these stories - all of which provide glimpses of Dubliners at a particular moment of insight and self-realisation in their lives - utterly fascinating. They contain memorable characters, beautiful language and a strong sense of place and time. In keeping with the fact that the stories provide merely a glimpse into the lives of the characters, there is little in the way of dramatic resolution.

    Instead, readers are left to wonder what may have happened to the character next before moving on to another story and another character. My experience of the work was considerable enhanced by listening to the audiobook narrated by Irish actor Jim Norton. Norton has also narrated Ulysses and I find myself no longer afraid of that particular work. View all 30 comments. Readers also enjoyed. Short Stories. About James Joyce. James Joyce. James Joyce, Irish novelist, noted for his experimental use of language in such works as Ulysses and Finnegans Wake Joyce's technical innovations in the art of the novel include an extensive use of interior monologue; he used a complex network of symbolic parallels drawn from the mythology, history, and literature, and created a unique language of invented words, puns, and allusions James Joyce, Irish novelist, noted for his experimental use of language in such works as Ulysses and Finnegans Wake Joyce's technical innovations in the art of the novel include an extensive use of interior monologue; he used a complex network of symbolic parallels drawn from the mythology, history, and literature, and created a unique language of invented words, puns, and allusions.

    James Joyce was born in Dublin, on February 2, , the eldest of ten surviving siblings, two other died of typhoid. His father was John Stanislaus Joyce, an impoverished gentleman, who had failed in a distillery business and tried all kinds of other professions, including politics and tax collecting. In spite of their poverty, the family struggled to maintain a solid middle-class facade. In he entered the University College, Dublin. It appeared in the Fortnightly Review in At this time he also began writing lyric poems. After graduation in the twenty-year-old Joyce went to Paris, where he worked as a journalist, teacher and in other occupations under difficult financial conditions.

    He spent a year in France, returning when a telegram arrived saying his mother was dying. Not long after her death, Joyce was traveling again. He left Dublin in with Nora Barnacle, a chambermaid who he married in